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Client Spotlight – On N Up Coaching Website Design

Client Spotlight: On N Up Coaching Website | Jenn Wells Design

The Client: On N Up Coaching

If I had to do an elevator pitch for Paul, I would say, “Running a business, working with a team, and finding a new job are all drastically different segments of professional life. But they have one thing in common: transition. Business owners, coworkers, and job seekers all need to be able to adapt to change. If they want to make the most of their lives, they need to take it a step further and optimize change. Paul helps professional people to do just that – adapt to and optimize times of transition in their lives.”

In other words, Paul is a business coach. And he needed his coaching website to reflect the reassurance and encouragement his clients seek from him.

Initial Concepts: Website Redesign

I’m already kicking myself for not taking a screenshot of Paul’s previous site. Since I didn’t I’ll have to describe it and hope you get the picture. Aesthetically, the old site wasn’t bad, but it had some issues with mobile responsiveness and the navigation was unclear. A big part of Paul’s social strategy involves blogging and his blog posts weren’t emphasized, nor were they easy to access. Stylistically, I decided to stick with the color and style since they matched Pauls’ logo and the company feel he wanted, but we decided to modernize it a bit and really overhaul the user experience.

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Client Spotlight – ETOS Consulting Logo & Website Design

Client Design Process: ETOS Consulting Logo, Website, and Business Cards | Jenn Wells Design

The Client: ETOS Consulting

I met Olivier, the founder of ETOS Consulting, at a networking event a little while back. (See? Networking does pay off!) This relationship has been amazing for me, because without even intending to, Olivier has given me ideas for better structuring and organizing my business from day 1.

Also from the beginning, Olivier was very clear and consistent about what he wanted: a clean, modern design for his consulting brand. Professional but unique enough to be eye-catching. Quite frequently professionalism is associated with the tried-and-true, so we had to toe a fine line between creative and traditional.

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Site Content – What Should You Put on Your Website?

What should you put on your website

You’ve got your site, but what should you put on it?

It can be overwhelming to stare at a blank page (or screen) and try to dredge content from the recesses of your brain. For yeeeears, my website had just 5 pages. And I still had trouble coming up with things to say. But in the past year, I’ve been really working on building and refining my business and now I’m up to 13, not including the blog. Take a guess at whether my SEO was better then or now. Continue…

Why You Need a Website

You Need a Website, Here's Why | Jenn Wells Design

This is a difficult post to write because it seems so intuitive to me. But I realize not everyone thinks or uses technology or even runs a business the same way. So let’s talk about the value of websites.

1. Websites Give You Credibility

I hate that this is my number one reason but it really is. It’s not compelling, it’s not a promise of guaranteed clients, or even guaranteed interaction from potential customers. But you still need to look like a legitimate business. And, these days, that involves a website and at least one social media page – preferably Facebook.

Speaking as a customer and not a designer, the first thing I do when I hear a business recommendation from a friend is to look it up online. If they don’t have a website, oftentimes I won’t go there. This is both because I’m looking for one central place to find the answers to my questions (location, hours, services, etc) and because not having a website makes it feel like that business doesn’t know what its doing.

2. Information for Customers

After credibility, I’d say the primary purpose a website serves is to answer your clients questions. They might be able to find those answers on Google or Facebook, but the best way to make sure customers get the correct information easily is to have your own website. Even without great SEO, most websites will come up in the search when the company name is Googled and that’s where your customer will click.

It’s not enough just to have a website – it needs to function and it needs to provide the basic information that your customers are looking for. Things I recommend you place in the header or footer so they’re always visible:

  • Phone Numbers
  • Email Address
  • Address
  • Social Media Links

Outside of that basic contact information, almost every website will NEED a services or products page, an about page, and a contact form. The about page will not receive nearly as many visits as the services page, or contact information (whether in the header or on its own page) BUT it needs to be there to reassure your customers that you are a real, legitimate business (see point #1).

3. Building Community

Obviously the best place to build community is on social media. But if you blog, your website can be a great resource as well. Blogging is good for SEO and it’s also a great tool to get customers returning to your website regularly to read your new content.

Why is community so important?

Mere-exposure effect. What this means is that the more often you come into contact with something (a person, business, concept) the more you like it. In this case familiarity breeds comfort rather than contempt.

Have you ever felt overwhelmed when researching a product to buy and ended up choosing a familiar-sounding brand? I have.

We live in a world of choices. Sometimes way too many choices, and sometimes we just want something that feels familiar and safe. If you use your website (and blog) to build a community, that’s a network that will look to you for answers and, eventually, help solving their problems with your product or service.

4. Advertising

I’m listing advertising last because SEO (search engine optimization) is such a tricky topic. You might be able to get to first page of search results for your keywords. But it will probably cost you some money, for an SEO expert and possibly PPC ads or various other Google SEO services.

While your website isn’t the absolute best tool for customer outreach, it is a pretty fantastic place to showcase your deals and offers. So advertising works very well in conjunction with community. You build your network and then, when someone shows interest, you send them to the relevant page on your site for all the information they may need.

This also works with social media offers and PPC (pay-per-click) ads. Alone, the ads can pique a potential customer’s interest, but they’ll want a legitimate, informative webpage to get more information before they sign up. And that’s what your landing page should do. Reiterate the offer, explain its value, and then provide an action for your user to take.

And that’s really what it’s all about. You need a website because you need customers. Customers need reassurance that you’re who you say you are (credibility), to know how to reach you (information), to feel comfortable with you (community), and a call to action to get started (advertising).